Wounded Times

Where Veterans Get Their News

Saturday, March 24, 2012

Is Wounded Warrior Project a country crock?

UPDATE Do not get confused by the different groups using Wounded Warrior in their name! Just an example, there is Wounded Warrior Program.
The Army Wounded Warrior Program (AW2) is the official U.S. Army program that assists and advocates for severely wounded, ill, and injured Soldiers, Veterans, and their Families, wherever they are located, regardless of military status. Soldiers who qualify for AW2 are assigned to the program as soon as possible after arriving at the WTU. AW2 supports these Soldiers and their Families throughout their recovery and transition, even into Veteran status. This program, through the local support of AW2 Advocates, strives to foster the Soldier's independence
This program has an excellent reputation but too many think it is part of Wounded Warrior Project.

The Marines have their own. Wounded Warrior Regiment


Being involved with a lot of groups, I am asked a lot why I do not support Wounded Warrior Project now. One example is the fact that since 2008, out of 14,500 posts on this blog, there are only 14 with Wounded Warrior Project in the tag line. This is not a good thing considering I track reports across the country.

About a year ago, I contacted Ed Shultz's radio program when I heard him advertising for Wounded Warrior Project and donations from USA Coffee going to them. He said they were working on PTSD, so I asked his producer what they were doing on PTSD in case I missed something. They didn't have an answer when I asked for specifics. A little while later, they were not talking about Wounded Warrior Project.

I know this won't be popular to do it but I can't support them at all. There are a lot of great charities out there actually trying to make a difference with very little money. There are way too many complaints about what they are not doing. Here are just a few.

Dec 12, 2011
Still a "D" from AIP
by: Anonymous

FYI, in the December 2011 Charity Watch guide (from AIP), WWP still has a D rating for very high Administrative/FR costs and a low percentage going to programs and services.

I want to scream at the radio every time I hear one of their (many) ads.


Feb 04, 2012
WWP PAYS for NON ADA-COMPLIANT Events
by: Anonymous

For the 3rd year in a row, injured heroes have been taken to places that are inaccessible to them - in Whitefish MT - INCLUDING FUNDRAISERS fully sanctioned by and in fact promoted by Wounded Warrior Project.

Wounded Warrior Project management is well aware of the lack of access by these businesses that are required to be accessible, but has decided they have the right to "suspend the ADA" by giving their violation a trendy new name - the name of the title held by the chaperone that saw the violations and did not report them last year, but assured us someone would take notice THIS TIME..

The irony and hypocrisy is unbelievable. They go to an event planned for them in places they can not get into independently or with dignity and safety, or go to the bathroom (because it's not accessible at all), so Wounded Warrior Project can raise money to help them live independently...in direct violation of the law that was enacted specifically to protect their right to access independently. And they get PAID to do this.

Individuals who are terminated from WWP are bound by a confidentiality agreement, but soldiers from past events are speaking out about these issues with far more frequency.

I will never support Wounded Warrior Project in any fashion ever again.


Feb 09, 2012
Claim of 82 cents per dollar is hogwash!
by: Former #1 Supporter

I have always been a huge supporter of our troops and an advocate for paying for their care. I have donated to WWP in the past and was in the process of putting together a fundraiser to raise money for their organization.

I have 11 team members and we are in the execution stages of an event planned in September. We are completing a website, and have accessed connections in media that could produce thousands of donations. I am thankful that we haven't officially selected WWP as our charity.

I had always assumed the WWP was a highly efficient organization based on its highly visible advocates. When I read that they gave 82 cents per dollar I was satisfied enough.

Last night I stumbled upon this website and was appalled at the comments. I decided to do my own research and was equally sickened by their claims of giving 82% back to the soldiers. Let's take a look at how they get this number. I will refer to this "Audited Financial Statement."


On page 3 you can see that they spent $54.9M on Program Services expenses out of a total of $66.96M total expenses. Simple division and you get 82%. That is how they claim that number.

But take a look at the next two pages to see exactly where that $54M goes.

To start, over $25M goes to "Media Ad Value." While it is certainly hopeful that $25M in ads will bring MORE than $25M in donations... that money does not count as going to the soldiers in MY book.

As you look down the list, the benefit that gets to the individual soldier is hard to account for.

How much of the nearly $2M spent on travel is for the executives and the board vs. a wounded warrior? How much of the $5M spent on postage is spent on getting items to the warriors? How much of the $317K spent on Telephone is spent talking to warriors?

I also found out that the top executive received $200K as well as an additional $190K that he received as a "consultant." $400K for a year for overseeing 100 employees? The whole "You need to pay to find good executives" argument is PURE hogwash.

There are millions of teachers, police officers, firefighters, and soldiers that give their entire lives away for $50K a year. Are you telling me that those people don't exist in the business world? Business is just people talking to people. The skills needed are no different than being a principal or police chief.

The more that I looked at the statement, the more "smoke" I saw. My organization has decided to forgo the WWP as the recipient of our funds and to focus on a charity that offers more than inflated advertising budgets, excessive executive pay and empty promises to our warriors.
read more here

Example of what they report under Benefits Service
Media ad value $ 2,307,198
Salaries 696,683
Advertising 649,750
Consulting and outside services 176,994
Direct mail 265,480
Postage and shipping 247,931
Travel 161,183
Payroll tax and benefits 148,070
Meetings and events 14,111
Promotional items 23,629
Grants -
Depreciation 51,166
Occupancy 36,088
Telephone 23,334
Miscellaneous 1,227
Professional fees - Office equipment rental and services 15,820
Supplies 6,360
Printing 1,985
Insurance 6,096
Utilities 3,167
Staff education 896
Books and Subscriptions 1,825
Bank service charges -
Organizational membership fees and dues -
$4,838,993

All this money goes to doing this according to their own site

A PARTNER IN THE PROCESS
To help warriors make the most of their benefits and successfully transition to life after injury, we provide warriors with the tools they need to become financially secure. Unlike traditional models of veterans' services, we identify the warrior's individual needs, in addition to providing economic empowerment. Our Benefits Service team ensures warriors and their families have information and access to government benefits, as well as our full range of programs and the community resources necessary for successful transition to life after injury.

A key part of this program is support and education for warriors, as well as their family members and caregivers. We advise warriors on their benefits, along with information on how to access those services through the Department of Defense (DOD) and Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).

Our service personnel work closely with each agency so they can walk warriors through every step of the process. When a claim is filed, we make sure it is processed correctly the first time and guide injured service members through this crucial part of their transition.

If you are in need of benefits assistance, Wounded Warrior Project™ (WWP) can help. WWP is a VA accredited organization and has experienced staff to help veterans with their VA claims. Please contact us at wwpservice@woundedwarriorproject.org for help with your benefits claims.

View our Policy and Government Affairs section for more information about WWP's legislative efforts.



Need a copy of your DD214 or service record?

These documents are always free to obtain for the service member and family members. Requests can be processed online or by mail/fax. To complete the online form or to print the form and mail/fax it to the National Personnel Records Center (NPRC), please follow the link below.
The mission of Wounded Warrior Project is to:
To raise awareness and enlist the public's aid for the needs of injured service members.
To help injured service members aid and assist each other.
To provide unique, direct programs and services to meet the needs of injured service members


This is from an accountant who took the time to look over their tax filings.

WWP 2010 Tax Return



The Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) 2010 Tax Return has been posted online. It follows the same formula - the percentage of expenses paid for Program Services was only 65% - according to page 10 of their IRS Form 940, posted at their web site.

FYE 2009 Officer salaries = $700,301
FYE 2010 Officer Salaries = $1,021,638

So here's the breakdown -
2008 - 64%
2009 - 62%
2010 - 65% of all expenses paid (out of CASH donated*) being used for veteran/wounded programs.

* Some of WWP's donations are "in kind" rather than cash - such as advertising time on radio and TV.

A+ charities should have 80% + going to programs. Even 75% would be better.

Just think what 10% more for programs could accomplish - we ALL owe it to our veterans to hold accountable the charities that we donate our money to.


Is this about raising awareness for the wounded or for Wounded Warrior Project?

They list providers from Give An Hour as part of what they do, but it looks like Give An Hour didn't mention them on their own listings for Florida.

Resources in Florida

Category Links
Mental Health Association of Southwest Florida
[3/24/2012]

The Mental Health Association of Southwest Florida is a nongovernmental voluntary citizen organization whose primary goals are to promote healthy emotional and mental development. The association's Web site, www.mhaswfl.org, has more information on its programs to support veterans.

Seminole Behavioral Healthcare
[3/24/2012]

Seminole Behavioral Healthcare is offering mental-health and substance-abuse counseling to military personnel and their families who work or reside in Seminole County and have been impacted by deployment to Afghanistan or Iraq. These services cover individual, couple and family therapy; drug and alcohol abuse; post-traumatic stress disorder and counseling for children of military personnel. The number of sessions will be determined on a case-by-case basis.

In addition to the counseling, “Mental Health First Aid” training will be offered to chaplains, senior military personnel, family readiness coordinators, service members and their families. Mental Health First Aid is a 12-hour training course designed to give attendees skills to recognize potential risk factors and warning signs for a range of mental-health problems, including depression, anxiety/PTSD, psychosis and psychotic disorders, eating disorders, substance abuse and self injury.

For more information, see our brochure. To take advantage of any of these services or for more information, military personnel and/or their families should call Laurie Reid, Director of Veteran Services for Seminole Behavioral Healthcare, at (407) 831-2411 ext. 1266. Visit us on the web at www.seminolecares.org and click on “Veteran Services” link on the left.

Paws for Patriots
[3/24/2012]

Since its founding in 1982, Southeastern (Florida)Guide Dogs has been a proud supporter of American veterans. Over the past 26 years, their expertise in training guide dogs to work with people who have multiple disabilities has led many disabled veterans to seek their services.
This is another great charity. Homes For Our Troops does a great job and uses very little for fundraising.

Homes For Our Troops

Another problem here in Florida is this group. Most people see them at intersections with their uniforms and buckets, thinking they are with the Disabled American Veterans, but they are not part of the DAV.
How much of your donations actually reaches veterans?
By Joe Crankshaw

$1.70.
That’s likely about how much of Navy veteran Gilbert Hahn’s $10 donation went to help his fellow vets.

After receiving a letter asking for a donation, Hahn, an 88-year-old Stuart resident, gave the money to a group called the National Veterans Services Fund. But only 17 percent, or $1.4 million of the $8.4 million the organization spent in 2008, went to help veterans, according to the most recent information supplied by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and the group’s own Internal Revenue Service filings.

“This is an outrage,” said Hahn, a veteran of service on board the USS Hancock in the South Pacific during World War II. “I gave them a small donation and they are back asking me if I forgot them and wanting more. They should be exposed and stopped. They are just making a living off us veterans.”

Hahn’s experience is not unusual.
click link for more



I did some temp work for Seminole Behavioral Healthcare and know first hand what a great job they do. I still have friends there and have taken some training through them. They are very interested in helping our veterans heal.

When it comes to the ads you see on TV, think about the organizations you don't see advertise and wonder why the others are spending so much money collecting your money. We all know about the USO but you don't see many ads for them. We all know about the Red Cross but unless there are major disasters draining their resources, you don't see their ads.

What this all boils down to is we need to ask about all these organizations popping up claiming to be all about the veterans when we are reading terrible reports getting worse. We need to support organizations putting the veterans first.

Besides, I want you to save some of your hard earned money for me if I ever get to the point where I start to ask for donations again. After all, considering what Wounded Warrior Project is doing for millions, I do the same thing for free except supply backpacks and taking them on trips!

I support
New England Center for Homeless Veterans
DAV
Point Man International Ministries
Orlando Nam Knights
just to name a few.

UPDATE
Wounded Warrior Project stated in a recent article they have 2,300 members.

The DAV on the other hand reports this
The 1.2 million-member Disabled American Veterans (DAV) is a non-profit 501(c)(4) charity dedicated to building better lives for America’s disabled veterans and their families.

The DAV was founded in 1920 by disabled veterans returning from World War I to represent their unique interests. In 1932, the DAV was congressionally chartered as the official voice of the nation’s wartime disabled veterans.

With our brave Americans leaving the battlefields of Iraq and Afghanistan, the DAV’s services and advocacy are as relevant and critical today as in any time in our nation’s history.

Annually, the DAV represents more than 200,000 veterans and their dependents with claims for benefits from the Department of Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense.

The DAV’s Voluntary Services Program operates a comprehensive network of volunteers who provide veterans free rides to and from VA medical facilities and improve care and morale for sick and disabled veterans.

The DAV’s 1.2 million members provide grassroots advocacy and services in communities nationwide. From educating lawmakers and the public about important issues to supporting services and legislation to help disabled veterans — the DAV is there to promote its message of hope to all who have served and sacrificed.

DAV STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES
Support and Revenue
SUPPORT
Contributions Received Primarily from Direct Mail Solicitation
$99,629,259

Contributed Services and Facilities, Primarily Services
$41,074,184

Bequests
$9,168,123

TOTAL SUPPORT
$149,871,566

Membership Dues
$5,386,895

Income from Investments, Net
$7,665,134

Realized Investment Gains
$1,961,014

List Royalties
$744,777


Miscellaneous
$38,775


TOTAL REVENUE
$15,796,595

TOTAL SUPPORT AND REVENUE
$165,668,161

DISABLED AMERICAN VETERANS
STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES EXPENSES
Program Services
National Service Program
$42,875,720

Legislative Program
$1,693,510

National Voluntary Service Program
$40,797,407

State Services, Disaster Relief and Memorials
$6,796,090

Publications and Other Communications
$5,697,335

Membership Program
$9,016,206

Public Awareness Outreach
$21,070,402

TOTAL PROGRAM SERVICES
$127,946,670

Supporting Services
Fund Raising Costs
$32,580,986

Administrative and General Expenses
$5,937,326

TOTAL SUPPORTING SERVICES
$38,518,312

TOTAL EXPENSES
$166,464,982


Granted I favor the DAV since I am a life member and have been Chaplain of the Orlando DAV Auxiliary for the last couple of years. But as such, I see what they do with the donations and most people had no clue. Now you do.

UPDATE Perfect example is events they hold are sponsored by others. This "Soldiers Ride" was sponsored by GEICO.
Wounded Warrior Project® Soldier Ride®™, sponsored by GEICO, rolls into North Fork, N.Y., September 7 WOODBURY, N.Y. -- Wounded Warrior Project®’s (WWP) Soldier Ride®™, sponsored by GEICO, will be in North Fork, N.Y. on Saturday, Sept. 7, with a start time of 8:30 a.m. at Mitchell Park, 15 Front St., Greenport, N.Y. Registration begins at 7 a.m. The finish location is at Greenport Skate Park, Moores Lane, Greenport, N.Y., where a community picnic will take place after the ride. This ride is open to the community, and people are encouraged to sign up to ride in the event or join the crowd from the sidelines with the GEICO Gecko to cheer on the riders. For registration and additional details on the ride, visit www.soldierride.org/northfork.

26 comments:

Anonymous said...

As a wounded soldier myself I feel that my service and sacrifice is being used by WWP to get into the wallets of true patriotic americans. You updated and said they claim 2300 "alumni", well I'm part of that number, yet they have never helped me out with the exception of the "backpack" which I didn't use anyways. I tried to get information for other wounded soldiers in my area to connect with them and they wouldn't allow it. And I have talked to many wounded soldiers and they have received nothing from WWP even when they were desperate for help. There are many small-time organizations that do 20 times what the project does with 20 percent of the money the project gets. Those in that category truly know what the effort is about and don't take salaries aren't selfish. WWP seems like it started with an amazing goal and seems to have lost that sight along the way. My last thoughts are don't let the brave actions and sacrifices of soldiers be used to make these people's wallets fatter. Look at the little organizations or ones started by other soldiers those are the ones with the right intentions and true patriotism motivating them.

Sincerely,
Corporal US Army (Medically Retired)

Chaplain Kathie said...

Thank you for your service and your comment but I am so sorry that you were not helped by them.
What most people don't understand is that the "mission" of WWP is to "raise awareness" and that they have done a good job on but most of the time I wonder if the awareness they are trying to raise is for the wounded veterans like you or for themselves.
You are right on the small organizations. I am a member of one of them. Point Man Ministries operates mostly out of our own pockets doing what we are compelled to do. While we do need donations, it doesn't cost much at all to help veterans heal. Plus we're too busy doing what is needed and not enough time left to do much else. Point Man started in 1984 and takes care of all generations with PTSD and their families.
There are others that have been around longer like the DAV, the VFW and the American Legion. I often wonder if these new groups only wanting to pay attention to the OEF OIF veterans are in it for the right reasons. All these other groups take care of all generations.
These groups started by veterans, for veterans and not themselves. Plus, we're all volunteers.

Anonymous said...

My experience with the Wounded Warrior Project is that they camp out at the Wounded Warrior Transition Units and really do nothing beyond getting their media shots with “eye candy”. I have read about the bags of clothes they give to those injured once they arrive at the major military hospitals from down range. This is great but don’t twist the story to show that had you (WWP) not given our injured care bags with clothes, the injured would go without. I would like to see any command at the military hospitals even think of letting an injured Service-Member go without clothes, they would be slammed. Service-Members transitioning through the WTU units are very well taken care of as well as their families. There will always be complaints but trust me and I know, go through the medical process due to injuries and not have a WTU and be thrown out on your ear with injuries from war…. It really sucks….WWP says they help Veterans…Well everyone I referred to them got no help at all. The folks I referred to them were not at a WTU or even near a military base and were not retired due to their injuries….So these Veterans are really on hard times and could use help…As stated before, the WWP only goes after “eye candy” and when the cameras’ are rolling, they are there… They aren’t helping any Veterans here in SW Virginia, hell the nearest rep is in NC camped out at FT. Bragg

Kathie Costos said...

Thanks for the update comment. People ask me how they get away with this but I remind them they do not claim to really be doing anything above the backpacks and "raising awareness" which they do very well. They must imply they are doing more when they show what the veterans with their replaced limbs. Now their latest commercials are talking about PTSD but again, never really say what they are doing on that either.

Ron Bienke said...

Wow, you guys got a backpack. I didn't even get that. I have been in the wounded warrior program for almost two years now and haven't seen anyone but Trace Adkins begging for money on TV. Now I have all my extremities but with through 5 surgeries so far. I would have thought that I would have al least heard of what they can do in a briefing or something. Upon research I have came to conclude that they are a complete scam that plays on the good will of the American people. Shame on them! Trace Adkins too! He is an enabler.

LTC US Army soon to be medically retired.

Kathie Costos said...

Ron,

I have to tell you that in the beginning I thought they would do what they say, but then when I started getting email complaints about them, it dawned on me, they really didn't say what they were doing for the money. They do that very well.

They talk about veterans supporting each other. WOW, now that really costs about the price of a phone call or a cup of coffee.

They say their mission is to raise awareness. Gee, I've been doing that since 1982 and up until August, out of our own pockets.

Raise awareness? There are over 17,000 news reports on this blog alone.

Videos? Done that one too to the point of over 100 of them ALL DONE FOR FREE.

I talk to veterans and their families all over the country and even a few overseas. The most this costs me is $2,000 a month when I have to travel a lot. There are a lot of groups doing the real work so when you see an expensive commercial, wonder why they spend money on that instead of the veterans.

The difference is, I don't have a salary or pay to raise funds. I'm too busy doing the work I set out to do.

I pray you get the help you not only need, but paid for ahead of time.

Anonymous said...

My son, a serious injured Marine signed on to the DAV for his VSO. Never returned his calls. This went on for 17 months. I had POA went in to talk the DAV and he gave me some lame excuse. Then I contacted the WWP in Chicago. I faxed her my son's VA claim. Within 6 mos. my son's claim was settled at 100%. So, my experience with the Wounded Warrior Project has been totally different than others on her.

Kathie Costos said...

Glad to hear they helped. As for the DAV, not that it is an excuse for this, they are volunteers for the most part and you could have asked for a new VSO. I also suggest you file a complaint with the DAV about the way your son's claim was handled. The leaders in the DAV need to know when someone is not doing their job.

I also hope your son is doing better now.

Anonymous said...

I met a WWP representative in Germany when I was MEDEVACED out of Afghanistan. I signed up when I was in Germany and was told they would help me when I got back to the states. Since I returned I have called numerous times and never received a call back or an email. I went to the DAV instead and they immediately helped me with my claim. I really hope the WWP is just understaffed.

Kathie Costos DiCesare said...

I am not sure what the deal is with them but they started out to "raise awareness" so maybe that's all they think they have to do.
I am very sorry you didn't get the help they promised but glad the DAV helped.
I don't know if WWP has certified service officers or not and to tell the truth, I'm having a hard time figuring out what they do with all the funds they get.
My other issue with them is they are only interested in OEF and OIF veterans when older veterans have been suffering even longer.
There are so many other groups out there without the attention or money doing good works for all veterans and I think they earned a lot more support than they get but since they've been around for decades, people forget all about them.
I hope, pray, this country finally gets it right for all veterans and I pray you are recovering.

Alexandre Gibson said...

Each case is individual. My wife and I have nothing but good experiences with the WWP. We have done several retreats and trainings. Their mission is true and we're in a much better place now thanks to the diligent efforts of our local coordinators. I just got back from Project Odyssey and came back (yes with a Duffel bag and track suit with a WWP cap and shirt) with a better knowledge of how to manage PTSD. The Vets I associate with that are in the WWP all have good things to say. There was even a rep that pushed my IU claim through and I'll have a decision soon within 6 months from submission. I'm sorry y'all didn't get what you wanted out of the WWP, but I wish you well. Semper Fi!

Cpl Gibson, USMC

Kathie Costos DiCesare said...

Thank you posting that. I have not heard many issues with the more "local" groups out there, so it is good to point out the difference. Most of the complaints have been about the main organization itself.

Anonymous said...

What about WWP helping service members who have never been deployed and are only ill, nothing service related! I know a soldier that was put into WWP because of cancer! That soldier has never even been deployed! That soldier still gets a regular paycheck and has all their medical paid for by the military. WWP actually gave that soldier gift cards to several different restaurants and agreed to help with what ever else that soldier needed! WWP is a crock! It hands out money to those that don't really need it and forgets the real soldiers who were wounded overseas in combat! By the way, this soldier who I speak of, already had a good chunk of change in the bank from a Life Insurance Policy gotten after the death of a family member. And, this soldier, so ill and needing "help" was out hunting and climbing a tree stand just the day before meeting with the WWP. This is why I will never give my money to WWP. I'll give it straight to the VA instead!

Jesse Hines Ret US Army said...

After getting out of the hospital and returning home I struggled to regain custody of my daughter. My combat injuries were used agianst me in family court. I called a wwp rep and was assured me they had lawyers just waiting to help. I was trusting them with my daughter. They did not show up for court and would not return calls. My wwp rep would not return my calls when I needed the wwp the most. I stood in court by myself humiliated as they unsealed my medical records in court and used my combat injuries agianst me. I lost. It took me a year and selling everything including my home. I lived in a van fighting for her. I had to do all of this with a brain injury and no help. The va helped by saying I was crazy, thanks va. Now I have a house and my daughter back. My AW2 advocate was the only one to finally help. AW2 advocates will fight for you, literally. I hope I never run into a wwp rep or event. Wwp left me outside the wire while they could hear me begging for help. The va will rat you out to anyone agianst you. I will never speak or have anything to do with traitors. Better off giving vets your ear and time, maybe a little respect, than money.

Kathie Costos DiCesare said...

Jesse, I am so sorry for what you had to go through to get your daughter back. So much suffering when none of it had to happen.

The Wounded Warrior Program is fabulous but too many get them confused with the "project." Glad you told your story and I pray you keep getting all the support you need.

Dallas Wills said...

I am Master Sergeant Dallas Wills I served 22 years in the USAF. COMBAT Related 100% disabled, Vietnam. Having lost the use of both hands and both legs. I am a lifetime member of the DISABLED AMERICAN VETERANS. (DAV). I tried to get help from the Veterans Administration (VA)for twenty years my disability caused me to quit work at 57 years old. I finally found out about the DAV, it took them no less than six months to get me my Disability at 100 % unemployable. I wanted to build a disabled house for my self. As my disability is progressive I have to use a wheelchair to get around. Unable to get an approval from the VA for an approved grant for two years. I decided to borrow the Money from the VA housing loan program and was turned down by over a dozen agencies I applied at the Wounded Warriors Project. They would not even talk to me. All I wanted was for them to find a loan agency. They told me you have to be wounded after 2003. This told me that they were a scam gathering money on the backs of the very worst wounded and here I am haven been suffering longer than the after 2003 wounded have even been alive. I can not see what the difference is. A wounded Warrior is a Wounded Warrior no matter if it took place during the Revolutionary war. I know that there are only WWII wounded Warriors still living bet like Hillary Clinton said "What difference does it make?"

Kathie Costos DiCesare said...

That is one of the biggest issues, among many, I have with WWP. They don't want to do anything for any other veterans. Not even Gulf War veterans.

I am sorry it happened to you.

There is a group that may help with the housing issues. Home Depot Foundation is doing fabulous work for ALL VETERANS in need of help. I've been involved with them a few times in the Orlando area, but I track what they are doing all over the country. They are amazing!

Just copy this link to them and apply.

http://homedepotfoundation.org/page/applying-for-a-grant

Dallas Wills said...

Korea, Vietnam Veteran, wounded Vietnam 1969. My condition is progressive. I am at the stage of unemployable, wheelchair bound. I worked the Veterans Program for over twenty years claiming my disability and it was not granted until I found out about the Disabled American Veterans They helped me get my award within six months. I give back to them when I can. They are the true Wounded Warrior Organization. The the VA has been approved to give a severely wounded Service Member a grant of 64,900 dollars for the loss of an eye, limb only things that is service connected to help build a handicapped house. I applied at the VA qualified lenders and was turned down by more than 12 Agencies. I applied to the VA for the grant and was told it would take up to two years to get the grant. I qualify by losing the use of both hands and both legs in Combat.

I contacted the Wounded Warrior Project . I only wanted them to help me secure a loan. They would not even talk to me. They said that they only help Wounded Warriors wounded after 2003. I figured right off that it was a scam. After all a Wounded Warrior is a wounded Warrior even if it happened in the the Revolution war. I mean no respect. I have been suffering longer than the after 2003 wounded warriors have been alive. I did find a loan with a local bank for a 5.2 percent loan and 5,000 dollars up front and 22,000 dollars interest over ten years. Hooyaw for the Wounded Warriors of America.

Dallas Wills said...

Just a reminder, not all organizations are perfect. I. Ordered twenty eight light bulbs from Home Depot and found out I needed four more and ordered them the next day. They cancelled the order for the four without even notifying me. I ordered the four again. I thought I was order the box of two but apparently they took the order for only two light bulbs and charged me for them. I have proof that I paid them for the bulbs because I paid for the light bulbs with PayPal. They say that they sent them. But I don't have them. You might say they are just light bulbs, what is the big deal? The light bulbs cost 45 dollars apiece.

Kathie Costos DiCesare said...

Expensive bulbs. Try calling the home office but remember the foundation is different from the store. Even at that, I hope you used your discount because Home Depot and Lowe's gives veterans discounts all year long.

David Fleck said...

I would encourage people to look at Folds of Honor Foundation and Warriors for Freedom Foundation.

Dallas Wills said...

There are a lot of Programd some Good, some not so good. I just know that I came back from Vietnam with something wrong wth me. I kept hearing about Agent Orange. Just a year later there was something wrong with my legs. I had a hard time running the three miles required by the USAF. By the time I was retired just four years later. My toes were numb. Two years later my legs were numb. I went to several Doctors and although I was diagnosed with Perhiperal Neuropathy they could not find out why. I went to the VA hospital for Agent Orange examination and they said it was not caused by Agent Orange. I put in for Agent Orange through the VA anyway and was turned down. I kept persueing it and they kept turning me down. I heard about the Disabled American Veterans. (DAV) after just a short time I was declared 100% disabled non employable. I joined the DAV. I fully support them. They help thousands of returning Veterans. They help get them what they deserve from the VA. They have. National fleet of vans and carry Veterans to the Hospitals. Their help with the veterans are is so much more than all of the other organizations. They do not ask for anything in return. If you know of anybody that needs help have them call the DAV, they have an office in every Veterans Hospital.

Kathie Costos DiCesare said...

My husband and I are both life members. I have been aware of how hard they work since my Dad, a Korean Vet was helped by them when I was just a kid. I am glad they helped you too. The really cool thing about them is you don't have to become a member for them to help you. Most join because they know there are more out there just like them needing help.
The DAV isn't prefect and there have been some issues depending on where you live because everyone is a volunteer, but as a whole, they are terrific. If anyone has issues with a service officer they can ask for someone else.

Eric Heineman - Broker/Realtor said...

Eric Heineman -

Look to help the forgotten! We have so much focus on the Vets...and we should, but we tend to forget the families that are left behind by our fallen heroes.
take a look at www.fallenpatriots.org, They want to make sure that every military child left behind receives a debt free college education! and their board pays 100% of all the admin costs so 100% of other donations goes to the grants they give out!!! How cool is that?

Francisco said...

I Francisco Fonseca am a USAF Vietnam veteran who is retired and living with scraps for an income. Unfortunately I am not able to make any financial donations but I could at least donate some food for thought for my future colleges. As the truth speaks for itself, we Vietnam vets were not treated with respect upon our returning from serving for our beloved country. In my opinion, we vets whom served to safeguard America during harsh times, should retire with our pay, the same as these politicians, who have such a poor reputation, related to professionalism. As I am passing on this "retirement pay suggestion", I keep passing it on, over and over thru my "E-Mails" to all my contacts, for them to keep passing it on as well. I do hope that you and your connections as well, keep passing forward this "retirement pay suggestion" so our future protectors of our country will have a proper pay for their retirements. May God keep blessing the military personnel that keep our country safe. My "E-Mail" is "puho1@yahoo.com".

Anonymous said...

I have also been disappointed by WWP. I was contacted on three different occasions to attend a retreat. When I explained that part of my PTSD kept me from being able to sleep in a room with someone else. I was then disqualified from attending because they wouldn't allow a single room even though I volunteered to pay for it. Ironically they could not accommodate my disability because of the cost. Betty